What's New

New HVAC system is the first step toward building becoming LEED certified

Orlando Science Center will use operations to educate public on sustainable technology

Orlando, FL - May 6, 2010 - The Orlando Science Center has embarked on a major retrofit of its facility to increase its energy efficiency, decrease operational costs and help serve as a community leader in the use of sustainable technologies. Born out of a need for a new HVAC system and a strong commitment to environmental stewardship, the Science Center will be participating in a number of sustainability efforts in the months and years ahead.   

The first step in this process was the recent installation of a new energy-efficient HVAC system, which is already providing cooler temperatures within the Orlando Science Center. Many partners contributed to the success of this effort, including Irvine Mechanical that helped select and install the new system, the City of Orlando and Orange County who assisted in securing federal stimulus dollars, and the Orange County Arts and Cultural Affairs Council, OUC - the Reliable One and Darden Environmental Trust for providing significant grants.

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Orlando Science Center Provides Title I Students With Tools for Future Success

AT&T donation to OSC

Photo Caption: Orlando Science Center President and CEO JoAnn Newman with AT&T's Judy Spencer, Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer and Orange County Commissioner Bill Segal. On behalf of the Orlando Science Center, Newman accepted a $50,000 grant from the AT&T Foundation during the Science Center's Otronicon event. The grant enabled nine Title I middle school classes to attend the event as well as fund 60 scholarships for a digital media academy for teens this summer.

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In 2009, Collin McAliley from Cocoa Beach Junior/Senior High School and James Brandenburg from Cocoa High School shared top honors at the 11th Annual Dr. Nelson Ying Student Science Competition at the Orlando Science Center.

Typically, the grand prize will only go to one winner, but competition founder Dr. Nelson Ying and the judges panel felt both students were worthy of acclaim. The remaining three finalists all received $1,000 fellowships to continue their research over the next year. Rather than split the grand prize into two, Ying awarded James and Collin equal cash prizes of $5,000 each.

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The year is 2008 and Noel Turner was announced as the 10th annual winner of the Dr. Ying Science Challenge at the Orlando Science Center. His submission of the project entitled “Bridge Over Troubled Neurons” earned 16-year-old Noel, a hefty $5,000. Noel’s research also won prizes at the Brevard County Intercoastal Science Fair.

What exactly did Noel investigate? Noel took it upon himself to figure out treatments to neural system diseases and injuries. The research focused on engineering a way to manipulate neurosystem stem cells into the body to help with diseases and injuries that damage, or even kill, existing nerve cells.

This was only one of the remarkable research entries recognized at a previous year’s competition. This year is sure to bring out more amazing talent from the Central Florida community. The Dr. Nelson Ying Student Science Competition will mark its 12th year in collaboration with the Orlando Science Center on April 23, 2010.

2008-OSC-Ying-Winner

 


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Emily Sotherland took home the grand prize from the Dr. Ying Science Competition in 2007. At the time, she was a junior at Merit Island’s Edgewood Jr./Sr. High School when she became the Ninth Annual winner of this competition at the Orlando Science Center.

Emily’s project was entitled “Modeling Artificial Surf Reefs and Their Ability to Create Surf Waves While Inhibiting Beach Erosion.” Through her research, Emily was able to show that a V-shaped artificial surf reef could inhibit beach erosion and create better waves for surfing. She won the $5,000 grand prize plus $1,000 prizes for her teacher and her school.

This was only one of the remarkable research entries recognized at a previous year’s competition. This year is sure to bring out more amazing talent from the Central Florida community. The Dr. Nelson Ying Student Science Competition will mark its 12th year in collaboration with the Orlando Science Center on April 23, 2010.

2007-OSC-Ying-Emily

 


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For a second year in a row there was a three-way tie for first place at Dr. Ying’s Student Science Competition. Shiv Gaglani, a senior from Brevard County’s West Shore Junior/Senior High School, Richard Zhang, another senior at West Shore, and Daniel Brandenburg, a freshman at Cocoa High School, each were awarded $5,000 and top honors for their exemplary science talent.

Their entries inspired Dr. Nelson Ying so much that instead of splitting the prize money three ways he provided additional funds so each winner took home the same amount of prize money. Richard’s entry explored the structure of the universe, which could help validate current scientific theories as well as lead to advancements in telescopes plus provide answers to questions about the birth and eventual collapse of the universe. Daniel’s project used computer wave simulations and physical models to identify wave patterns that could be used to predict hurricanes and tsunamis.

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This was the first year in the history of the Dr. Ying Student Science Competition that there was a three-way tie for first place.

Gabrielle A. Gianelli, a junior at Orange County’s Lake Highland Preparatory School; Nimish P. Ramanlal, a junior at Seminole County’s Seminole High School; and Shiv Gaglani, a junior at Brevard County’s West Shore Jr./Sr. High School, all took home $5,000 prizes. This also marked Shiv’s second time as a top winner.

The winning projects included Gabrielle’s mathematical analysis of Mars that could assist NASA with their search for signs of water on the Red Planet; Nimish’s plan to improve high-powered quantum computers so they could better assist in the research and development of nanobots that could help cure a variety of diseases; and Shiv’s experiments to increase the potency of adult stem cells, which could curb the controversy surrounding embryonic stem cell research.

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777 E. Princeton Street • Orlando, Florida 32803 • Phone: 407.514.2000 • TTY: 407.514.2005 • Toll Free: 888.OSC.4FUN • Email: gservices@osc.org
  Orlando Science Center is supported by United Arts of Central Florida, host of power2give.org/centralflorida and the collaborative Campaign for the Arts.
This project is funded in part by Orange County Government through the Arts & Cultural Affairs Program. Privacy Policy • Accessibility